How Credit Scores Affect Your Mortgage Application?
Most lenders have a baseline credit score by which they largely make their decision to approve or deny mortgage applicants. The maximum credit score is 850 (though a score of 850 is rare, indeed. Only about 10% of applicants have a score over 800). Any score in the 700s or above is excellent and will get you a loan with the lowest interest rate. When you get into the 600s it starts getting dicey. A score of 680, for example, is still considered good, but when you get below 660, some lenders start saying, “No.”

For others, 640 or 620 is the line at which you won’t be considered for their better programs. Once you get into the 500s, you are a candidate only for what the industry calls subprime loans, those with interest rates that are a couple of percentage points higher than those offered to prime borrowers. Subprime loans also often come with a lot of hidden charges.

If you have bad credit scores, there are ways to improve your credit health. If you find your scores are lower than you expected, you’ll need to engage in credit rehab. This is different from credit repair, defined as going to an outside company that promises to cure your problems and raise your scores. There may be some good ones out there (along with some disreputable ones) but they can’t do anything you can’t do yourself and you shouldn’t waste your time or money going to them for help.

From a financial standpoint, it is almost always better to take the time to improve your credit health, and make yourself eligible for a better interest rate, than it is to apply for a loan with a credit score that will only make you eligible for a subprime loan.

Home Mortgage Pre-Qualification
Getting pre-qualified is an informal process in which you are interviewed by a mortgage professional about your income and expenses. This gives you a general idea of the price range you can afford. It really doesn’t bring you any closer to securing a mortgage.

Getting Pre-Approved
Pre-approval is actually quite simple. All you have to do is provide your lender the documentation that they require. Be prepared to supply your loan representative with pay stubs, bank account statements, tax returns and W-2 forms from the previous 2 years, and documents to show other sources of income (which could include a second job, overtime, commissions and bonuses, interest and dividend income, Social Security payments, VA and retirement benefits, alimony, and child support). Be aware, however, that your loan representative is not the one who will ultimately approve your loan. That is the underwriter’s role.

Home Mortgage Commitment
A lender will issue a loan commitment after it has approved both you and the property you intend to purchase. Having examined all of the necessary documentation to verify your ability and willingness to repay the loan, your loan representative will submit your complete application to the underwriter. The underwriter will return one of four decisions: approval, approved with conditions, suspended (which means they need more documentation from you before they can make a decision), or denied.